Slack is bad for you

So many great quotes in this piece on Slack:

slack empowers your worst people to overwhelm your best. It has that in common with the open office.
It normalizes interruptions, multitasking, and distractions, implicitly permitting these things to happen IRL as well as online. It normalizes insanely short reply times for questions. In the slack world people can escalate from asking in a room to @person to @here in a matter of minutes. And they’re not wrong to – if your request isn’t handled in 5 minutes it’s as good as forgotten

and

When everything is urgent nothing is. This is the master plan of the villain in pixar’s incredibles. slack is a supervillain plot to destroy your team.

and

Goodhart’s law is the one where turning a metric into a target makes it a bad metric. Slack subverts valuable work by making productivity = availability on slack.

This all brings to mind Deep Work and this quote specifically:

If you send and answer e-mails at all hours, if you schedule and attend meetings constantly, if you weigh in on instant message systems like Hall within seconds when someone poses a new question, or if you roam your open office bouncing ideas off all whom you encounter — all of these behaviors make you seem busy in a public manner. – Deep Work1

Now you may know that I have a membership community and we have a Slack channel. So, how do I deal with that?

I don’t open it in the mornings until I’ve moved my big rocks for the day. I have it open in the afternoons and if I need to focus, off Slack goes again.

This is my Mullet Method.

You should go read this excellent whole rant about Slack and then start using it appropriately in your business.

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